Area Code 461

    area code

  • The Chinese Telephone Code Plan is the way to group telephone numbers in the mainland of the People’s Republic of China. Land lines and mobile phones follow different systems: land lines use area codes, while mobile phones do not.
  • A three-digit number that identifies one of the telephone service regions into which the US, Canada, and certain other countries are divided and that is dialed when calling from one area to another
  • a number usually of 3 digits assigned to a telephone area as in the United States and Canada
  • A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunications to allocate telephone numbers to subscribers and to route telephone calls in a telephone network. A closed numbering plan, such as found in North America, imposes a fixed total length to numbers.

    461

  • * August 2—Majorian resigns as Emperor; shortly afterwards Libius Severus is declared emperor by Ricimer.
  • 400 (four hundred) is the natural number following 399 and preceding 401. (For the year 400 AD, see 400)

area code 461

area code 461 – Tissot Men's

Tissot Men's T17158652 PRC 200 Chronograph Watch
Tissot Men's T17158652 PRC 200 Chronograph Watch
The Tissot Men’s PRC 200 Chronograph Watch features three large, easy-to-read chronograph subdials and a tachymeter for enhanced functionality. Constructed with a stainless steel case, the watch includes a stationary stainless steel bezel and a stainless steel link bracelet with a secure fold-over-clasp-with-push-button. A scratch-resistant sapphire window shields the black dial face, which features bold white hour markers and Arabic numeral indexes at three, nine, and 12 o’clock. The dial also includes three chronograph subdials with vibrant yellow hands, a date calendar at four o’clock, and is encircled by a white tachymeter. Powered by Swiss-quartz movement, this timepiece is water resistant to 660 feet.

US Air Force MH-53 Pave Low

US Air Force MH-53 Pave Low
A U.S. Air Force MH-53 Pave Low helicopter from the 20th Expeditionary Special Operations Squadron sits on the tarmac prior to a final combat mission at Joint Base Balad, Iraq, on Sept. 27, 2008. The Pave Low is being retired after nearly forty years of service to the Air Force.
The Sikorsky MH-53 Pave Low series is a long-range combat search and rescue (CSAR) helicopter for the United States Air Force. The series was upgraded from the HH-53B/C, variants of the Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion. The HH-53 "Super Jolly Green Giant" was initially developed to replace the HH-3 "Jolly Green Giant". The helicopters later transitioned to Special Operations missions. The U.S. Air Force’s MH-53J/M fleet was retired in September 2008 and was replaced by the CV-22B Osprey.
Design and development
The US Air Force ordered HH-53B and HH-53C variants for Search and Rescue units, and developed the MH-53J Pave Low version for Special Operations missions.
The Pave Low’s mission was low-level, long-range, undetected penetration into denied areas, day or night, in adverse weather, for infiltration, exfiltration and resupply of special operations forces. Pave Lows often work in conjunction with MC-130H Combat Talon for navigation, communications and combat support, and with MC-130P Combat Shadow for in-flight refueling.
The large green airframe of the HH-53B earned it the nickname Super Jolly Green Giant. This name is a reference to the smaller HH-3E Jolly Green Giant, a stretched variant of the H-3 Sea King, used in the Vietnam War for combat search-and-rescue (CSAR) operations.
HH-53B
The US Air Force favorably regarded their Sikorsky S-61R/HH-3E "Jolly Green Giant" long-range combat search and rescue (CSAR) helicopters and was interested in the more capable S-65/CH-53A. In 1966, the USAF awarded a contract to Sikorsky for development of a CSAR variant of the CH-53A.
A HH-53B of the 40th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron refueling from a HC-130P Hercules over North Vietnam, 1969-70

The HH-53B, as it was designated, featured:

A retractable in-flight refueling probe on the right side of the nose.
Spindle-shaped jettisonable external tanks with a capacity of 650 US gallons (2,461 L), fitted to the sponsons and braced by struts attached to the fuselage.
A rescue hoist above the right passenger door, capable of deploying a Forest penetrator on 250 feet (76 m) of steel cable.
Armament of three pintle-mounted General Electric GAU-2/A 7.62 mm (.308 in) six-barreled Gatling-type machine guns, with one in a forward hatch on each side of the fuselage and one mounted on the tail ramp, with the gunner secured with a harness.
A total of 1,200 pounds (540 kg) of armor.
A Doppler navigation radar in the forward belly.
Early HH-53Bs featured T64-GE-3 turboshafts with 3,080 shaft horsepower (2,297 kW) each, but these engines were later upgraded to T64-GE-7 turboshafts with 3,925 shaft horsepower (2,927 kW). Five crew were standard, including a pilot, copilot, crew chief, and two pararescuemen.
HH-53C
An HH-53C lowering a PJ during a rescue mission, June 1970
The HH-53B was essentially an interim type, with production quickly moving on to the modestly improved Air Force HH-53C CSAR variant. The most visible difference between the HH-53B and HH-53C was that the HH-53C dispensed with the fuel-tank bracing struts. Experience with the HH-53B showed that the original tank was too big, adversely affecting performance when they were fully fueled, and so a smaller 450 US gal (1,703 L) tank was adopted in its place. Other changes included more armor and a more comprehensive suite of radios to improve communications with C-130 tankers, attack aircraft supporting CSAR actions, and aircrews awaiting rescue on the ground. The HH-53C was otherwise much like the HH-53B, with the more powerful T64-GE-7 engines.
A HH-53 seen from the gunner’s position of a helicopter over Vietnam in October 1972
A total of 44 HH-53Cs were built, with introduction to service in August 1968. Late in the war they were fitted with countermeasures pods to deal with heat-seeking missiles. As with the HH-53B, the HH-53C was also used for covert operations and snagging reentry capsules, as well as snagging reconnaissance drones. A few were assigned to support the Apollo space program, standing by to recover an Apollo capsule in case of a launchpad abort, though such an accident never happened.
In addition to the HH-53Cs, the Air Force obtained 20 CH-53C helicopters for more general transport work. The CH-53C was apparently very similar to the HH-53C, even retaining the rescue hoist, the most visible difference being that the CH-53C did not have an in-flight refueling probe. Since CH-53Cs were used for covert operations, they were armed and armored like HH-53Cs.
A good number of Super Jollies were converted into Pave Low special-operations helicopters.[7] PAVE or Pave is a USAF code name for a number of weapons systems using advance

US Air Force MH-53 Pave Low

US Air Force MH-53 Pave Low
MH-53 Pave Low helicopters prepare to take off for their final combat mission Sept. 27 in Iraq. The MH-53 was retired from the Air Force inventory Sept. 30. It was the largest and most technologically advanced helicopter in the Air Force, with a service record dating back to the Vietnam War.
The Sikorsky MH-53 Pave Low series is a long-range combat search and rescue (CSAR) helicopter for the United States Air Force. The series was upgraded from the HH-53B/C, variants of the Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion. The HH-53 "Super Jolly Green Giant" was initially developed to replace the HH-3 "Jolly Green Giant". The helicopters later transitioned to Special Operations missions. The U.S. Air Force’s MH-53J/M fleet was retired in September 2008 and was replaced by the CV-22B Osprey.
Design and development
The US Air Force ordered HH-53B and HH-53C variants for Search and Rescue units, and developed the MH-53J Pave Low version for Special Operations missions.
The Pave Low’s mission was low-level, long-range, undetected penetration into denied areas, day or night, in adverse weather, for infiltration, exfiltration and resupply of special operations forces. Pave Lows often work in conjunction with MC-130H Combat Talon for navigation, communications and combat support, and with MC-130P Combat Shadow for in-flight refueling.
The large green airframe of the HH-53B earned it the nickname Super Jolly Green Giant. This name is a reference to the smaller HH-3E Jolly Green Giant, a stretched variant of the H-3 Sea King, used in the Vietnam War for combat search-and-rescue (CSAR) operations.
HH-53B
The US Air Force favorably regarded their Sikorsky S-61R/HH-3E "Jolly Green Giant" long-range combat search and rescue (CSAR) helicopters and was interested in the more capable S-65/CH-53A. In 1966, the USAF awarded a contract to Sikorsky for development of a CSAR variant of the CH-53A.
A HH-53B of the 40th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron refueling from a HC-130P Hercules over North Vietnam, 1969-70

The HH-53B, as it was designated, featured:

A retractable in-flight refueling probe on the right side of the nose.
Spindle-shaped jettisonable external tanks with a capacity of 650 US gallons (2,461 L), fitted to the sponsons and braced by struts attached to the fuselage.
A rescue hoist above the right passenger door, capable of deploying a Forest penetrator on 250 feet (76 m) of steel cable.
Armament of three pintle-mounted General Electric GAU-2/A 7.62 mm (.308 in) six-barreled Gatling-type machine guns, with one in a forward hatch on each side of the fuselage and one mounted on the tail ramp, with the gunner secured with a harness.
A total of 1,200 pounds (540 kg) of armor.
A Doppler navigation radar in the forward belly.
Early HH-53Bs featured T64-GE-3 turboshafts with 3,080 shaft horsepower (2,297 kW) each, but these engines were later upgraded to T64-GE-7 turboshafts with 3,925 shaft horsepower (2,927 kW). Five crew were standard, including a pilot, copilot, crew chief, and two pararescuemen.
HH-53C
An HH-53C lowering a PJ during a rescue mission, June 1970
The HH-53B was essentially an interim type, with production quickly moving on to the modestly improved Air Force HH-53C CSAR variant. The most visible difference between the HH-53B and HH-53C was that the HH-53C dispensed with the fuel-tank bracing struts. Experience with the HH-53B showed that the original tank was too big, adversely affecting performance when they were fully fueled, and so a smaller 450 US gal (1,703 L) tank was adopted in its place. Other changes included more armor and a more comprehensive suite of radios to improve communications with C-130 tankers, attack aircraft supporting CSAR actions, and aircrews awaiting rescue on the ground. The HH-53C was otherwise much like the HH-53B, with the more powerful T64-GE-7 engines.
A HH-53 seen from the gunner’s position of a helicopter over Vietnam in October 1972
A total of 44 HH-53Cs were built, with introduction to service in August 1968. Late in the war they were fitted with countermeasures pods to deal with heat-seeking missiles. As with the HH-53B, the HH-53C was also used for covert operations and snagging reentry capsules, as well as snagging reconnaissance drones. A few were assigned to support the Apollo space program, standing by to recover an Apollo capsule in case of a launchpad abort, though such an accident never happened.
In addition to the HH-53Cs, the Air Force obtained 20 CH-53C helicopters for more general transport work. The CH-53C was apparently very similar to the HH-53C, even retaining the rescue hoist, the most visible difference being that the CH-53C did not have an in-flight refueling probe. Since CH-53Cs were used for covert operations, they were armed and armored like HH-53Cs.
A good number of Super Jollies were converted into Pave Low special-operations helicopters.[7] PAVE or Pave is a USAF code name for a number of weapons systems u

area code 461

461 Ocean Boulevard
Eric Clapton Merchandise

The 1974 album on which Clapton’s solo career truly caught fire, 461 Ocean Boulevard is best remembered for its hit version of Bob Marley’s “I Shot the Sheriff”–perhaps the first time many in America ever heard the rhythms of reggae music. But it’s also an album on which emotions run high, especially on two Clapton originals, the prayerful “Give Me Strength” and the pleading “Let It Grow.” Clapton maintains his grounding in the blues with versions of Robert Johnson’s “Steady Rollin’ Man” and Elmore James’s “I Can’t Hold Out”; revisits a rock & roll classic in Johnny Otis’s “Willie and the Hand Jive”; and turns the standard “Motherless Children” into a showcase of snarling guitars. Following a period of dark reclusiveness, 461 Ocean Boulevard was a powerful comeback for Clapton. –Daniel Durchholz

This was Clapton’s comeback record after a long bout with heroin addiction. Up through 1970 or so, he had been a restless musical seeker, opening rock up with his guitar experimentation, trying to get to the bottom of the blues. There is none of this on 461. He seems relieved just to be alive. It’s a low-key affair, and that suits him. Some of his best songs are here, as well as his cover of Bob Marley’s “I Shot the Sheriff.” Torn and frayed from the melee inside him, this album may be the most personal blues he ever made. –Steve Tignor